Trees and Houses Near the Jas de Bouffan

Trees and Houses Near the Jas de Bouffan
Trees and Houses Near the Jas de Bouffan

Cezanne devoted his life entirely to painting. It was not until his last years that he was understood and ad-mired by a small group of painters and one or two far-sighted collectors and dealers. But in the half-century which has passed since his death, his influence has dominated almost every movement of modern painting.

He was born in 1839 in Aix-en-Provence, a provincial town in southern France. His father, a self-made man,started as a hat maker and became one of the most prominent bankers of the town. It was thanks to the money he left his family that Paul was able to continue painting in spite of his failure to sell any of his work until just before the end of his life. His father had wanted him to enter the family business and sent him to law school. But the boy had made up his mind to be a painter; and after many family arguments, and one false start, he was given an allowance and sent to study art in Paris.

There he joined Emile Zola, his closest boyhood friend,and together they became part of the group of young artists who lived the Bohemian life and planned to revolutionize the traditions of painting. Among their friends were the men who have become famous as the greatest painters of their day: Manet, Degas, Renoir, and Monet.

Cezanne worked in Paris or in the country nearby and spent much time with his friends in the cafes the organizing about the "new" style of painting. Each year he submitted a painting to the Salon, but he was always turned down. He also showed his work in the independent exhibitions which his group of friends organized and which earned for them the name "Impressionists." Not only the critics, but also the public laughed at the paintings; and with the exception of an isolated few, no one understood them. People of every period in history have certain visual habits acquired from what they are used to seeing around them; and in the second half of the nineteenth century,these habits were formed by the works of the old masters, discolored and darkened by yellow varnish, and by the Salon painters who imitated them. As a result,the bright colors used by the young painters seemed harsh, and their fresh, unconventional drawing awkward.Cezanne's paintings, perhaps because of their intense conviction, attracted more attention, and drew more abuse and ridicule than those of the other members of the group.The hostility of both critics and public was among the most important factors in Cezanne's life and had a pro-found effect on his character and painting. He returned to Aix and, except for occasional trips to Paris, he remained there until his death in 1906.

The Banker's Table

The Banker's Table
The Banker's Table, By William Michael Harnett
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American artist William Michael Harnett (1848–1892), in 1877.

In Hot Pursuit

In Hot Pursuit
In Hot Pursuit, By Charles Schreyvogel
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American  Charles Schreyvogel (1861–1912), after 1870.

The True American, By Enoch Wood Perry

The True American, By Enoch Wood Perry
The True American, By Enoch Wood Perry
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American  Sanford Robinson Gifford (1823–1880), in 1870.

Tivoli, By Sanford Robinson Gifford

Tivoli, By Sanford Robinson Gifford
Tivoli, By Sanford Robinson Gifford
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American  Sanford Robinson Gifford (1823–1880), in 1870.

A Cosey Corner

A Cosey Corner
A Cosey Corner
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American  Frank Millet (1846–1912), in 1884.

Geraldine Russell, By John White Alexander

Geraldine Russell, By John White Alexander
Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American artist William Trost Richards (American, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1833–1905 Newport, Rhode Island), in 1875.

Indian Summer

Indian Summer
Indian Summer, By William Trost Richards

Paintings Oil on canvas - American culture - By the American artist William Trost Richards (American, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1833–1905 Newport, Rhode Island), in 1875.